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Citation Information

Type Working Paper - Research Square Preprints
Title Dynamics of health among adults in South Africa
Author(s)
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2020
URL https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-98290/v1
Abstract
This paper estimates trend of health mobility in South Africa using National Income Dynamic Study (NIDS) and investigate whether the patterns of health mobility differs within socioeconomic groups created by income and gender. Health is measured by SRHS, which correlates with mortality and morbidity; thus, it is the best measure of health. Using five waves of NIDS and various econometric models, this research estimates health mobility in the period between 2007 and 2017. This study will use transition matrix as descriptive analysis of health mobility and Conditional Maximum Likelihood Estimations to analyse health mobility, trend of health mobility and relationship between health mobility and health inequality within NIDS. The study shows that, among poor males, health mobility neither follows a health selection or health constraint mobility trend; the high health mobility with ambiguous trends has not decreased health inequality. Among the poor females, a negative health mobility trend is observed; this research also found that health inequality has not creased. Among the non-poor males, it is found that health mobility follows a gradient constraint trend which has decreased health inequality. Among non-poor females, it is found that health mobility follows a health selection trend which has not decreased health inequality. The results suggest that policy makers should target both social determinants of health and health campaigns to deal with health inequality among the poor males. The trend of health mobility among poor females suggest that policy makers should target the social determinants of health to combat health inequality. The trend of health mobility among the non-poor males suggests that health mobility will eliminate health inequality. Lastly, the trend of health mobility suggests that policymakers should target health campaigns to deal with health inequality.

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