Central Data Catalog

Citation Information

Type Report
Title Generating extreme inequality: schooling, earnings and intergenerational transmission of human capital in South Africa and Brazil.
Author(s)
Volume 99-439
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 1999
Page numbers 0-0
Publisher Population Studies Centre
City Ann Arbor
Country/State Michigan, Unites States of America
URL http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/pdf/rr99-439.pdf
Abstract
Large household surveys are used to analyze links between schooling inequality and earnings inequality in Brazil and South Africa, countries which have long had among the highest levels of income inequality in the world. Although the countries have similar earnings inequality, South Africa has much lower inequality in schooling. The contribution of schooling to earnings inequality is very similar in the two countries, however, due to the convex relationship between schooling and earnings. If the countr ies traded schooling distributions or returns to schooling there would be little effect on earnings inequality. Both countries demonstrate strong relationships between parents' schooling and children's schooling, a key component of the intergenerational transmission of inequality. Significantly, however, the penalty for having poorly educated parents is much smaller in South Africa. The results suggest that even large improvements in schooling may be associated with inertia in earnings inequality in developing countries.

Related studies

»
Lam, David. Generating extreme inequality: schooling, earnings and intergenerational transmission of human capital in South Africa and Brazil.. Ann Arbor, Michigan, Unites States of America: Population Studies Centre, 1999.
Copyright DataFirst, University of Cape Town