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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology
Title Long term mortality after community and facility based treatment of severe acute malnutrition: Analysis of data from Bangladesh, Kenya, Malawi and Niger
Author(s)
Volume 4
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2012
Page numbers 215-225
URL http://www.academicjournals.org/jphe/PDF/pdf2012/Oct/Bahwere et al.pdf
Abstract
The effectiveness of the community based therapeutic care (CTC) in treating severe acute malnutrition (SAM) has been demonstrated. However, there is still resistance from some policy makers and donors to invest into this cost-effective intervention. The mortality rate ratio (MRR) calculated by dividing the observed deaths after discharge by expected deaths was used to compare survival of 1,670 children discharged from the Dowa CTC from August 2002 to May 2005 and that of other cohorts reporting on
long term survival of children after treatment of SAM retrieved from literature. A MMR of 1.1 (0.9 to 1.4) was observed for the Dowa CTC cohort while the MMR of 2.7 (1.3 to 4.9), 5.5 (3.9 to 7.6) and 20.0 (11.0 to 33.4) were observed for studies retrieved from the literature. Data showed that the survival of children who defaulted was worse than that of those who were discharged cured, and that of children treated at home after stabilisation or directly was better than those treated as inpatient until exit from the
programme. The study outlines the need of using MMR when reporting on long term survival after SAM treatment and suggests that CTC should be included in the package of interventions with high potential for accelerating the progress towards reaching Millennium Developmental Goal four.

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Bahwere, Paluku, Angella Mtimuni, Kate Sadler, Theresa Banda, and Steve Collins. "Long term mortality after community and facility based treatment of severe acute malnutrition: Analysis of data from Bangladesh, Kenya, Malawi and Niger." Journal of Public Health and Epidemiology (2012).
Copyright DataFirst, University of Cape Town