Central Data Catalog

Citation Information

Type Book
Title Quality of care and utilisation of MCH and FP services at Kenyan health facilities
Author(s)
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 1999
Page numbers 0-0
Publisher Population Council
URL http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PNACL117.pdf
Abstract
The quality of services is playing an increasingly important role in many family planning programmes. Many family planning programmes have abandoned the emphasis of setting numerical goals as an indicator of programme achievement in favour of client-centred measurements. To attract new clients and improve continuity of use of contraceptives, providers endeavour to offer services that appeal to potential clients who are concerned about quality. The growth of management theories and new methods of quality assurance have made an impact on the health care industry and this has resulted in greater focus on client-centred services. Further, the call by the International Conference on Population and Development (1994) for more client-centred services has legitimised the importance of quality in reproductive health services. In 1995, a national Situation Analysis Study of 254 health facilities was conducted in Kenya and the objective was to assess the status and quality of family planning services in the country. Based on this survey, an in-depth survey of a sub-sample of 28 health facilities was conducted the following year. From these facilities, 1834 women were interviewed about their experiences with services at facilities when they sought antenatal, child health and family planning services. For each woman, the experience was related to the last child. The goal of the in-depth survey was to examine the links between quality of care in family planning services and contraceptive behaviour. A key focus of the study was directed at information and counselling as elements of service quality. Further, the subject of quality was explored in the context of how women switched facilities for the same and different services of antenatal care, child health and family planning

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