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Citation Information

Type Thesis or Dissertation - http://dspace.knust.edu.gh:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/1189
Title Birthweight of newborns in relation to the nutritional status of pregnant women in the Atwima Nwabiagya district of Ashanti Region of Ghana
Author(s)
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2011
Page numbers 0-0
URL http://dspace.knust.edu.gh:8080/jspui/bitstream/123456789/1189/3/Joyce Bentum.pdf
Abstract
Several studies have shown an association between gestational weight gain, maternal haemoglobin levels during pregnancy and infant birth weight. Since such an association is influenced by geographical factors, it is important that investigations be carried out in the various districts in Ghana to establish it. This research was therefore conducted to assess the nutritional status of pregnant women in the Atwima Nwabiagya district of Ashanti Region of Ghana. Specifically, gestational weight gains and haemoglobin levels of pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in the Nkawie Government Hospital were assessed to ascertain if they were appropriate as recommended as well as examine the effects of these indicators of nutritional status on infant birth weight, and the frequency of certain foods intake.
The study was observational and the design was a cross sectional prospective survey involving 150 pregnant women aged 15-49 years. Structured questionnaire and records from maternal health record books including body weight and haemoglobin levels were used for the assessment. A recall of the pattern of food intake weekly and quantity of water per day were also used in collecting data from July 2010 to October 2010. A simple random sampling technique was used to select 150 pregnant women attending ANC at the Nkawie Government Hospital, while purposive sampling was used in the choice of the Hospital.
The major findings from the study indicated that 91.2% of women did not gain the recommended weight during second trimester of pregnancy. Mean weight gain during second trimester was 2.2± 2.1kg. Also 95.3% did not gain the recommended weight in their third trimester. Mean weight at third trimester was 2.9± 2.2kg.The prevalence of anaemia at first, second and third trimesters were 63.2%, 80.7% and 88.7% respectively. Mean haemoglobin levels at first, second and third trimesters were 10.4± 1.8g/dl; 6.1± 1.6g/dl; and 9.9± 1g/dl respectively. An association was found between gestational haemoglobin levels at first and third trimester and infant birth weight (p value = 0.008). There were 12 babies born with LBW. Mean birth weight was 2.9± 0.5kg. Intake of fruits and green leafy vegetables per week were very low. Majority (70%) pregnant women took the recommended quantity of water per day.
Generally, the nutritional status of pregnant women attending ANC at the Nkawie government hospital is poor. This notwithstanding, the effects of the poor nutritional status evidenced by inadequate gestational weight gain and high levels of anaemia on the infants birth weight was minimal, as only 8% of babies born had LBW and this is lower than the LBW rate of 12% in sub Saharan Africa.

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Bentum, Joyce. "Birthweight of newborns in relation to the nutritional status of pregnant women in the Atwima Nwabiagya district of Ashanti Region of Ghana." http://dspace.knust.edu.gh:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/1189, KWAME NKRUMAH UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY , 2011.
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