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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - Bulletin of the African and African American Studies Program Grand Valley State University
Title Perceptions of return migrants and non-migrants to female migration: Case of Ghana
Author(s)
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2007
Page numbers 12-0
URL http://websrv-al.server.gvsu.edu/cms3/assets/0B4E40FA-03CD-1029-5219639A55372427/UmojaAll 12 7​07.pdf#page=14
Abstract
The past three decades have witnessed a phenomenal increase in female migration especially in developing countries where females now migrate independently. These forms of migration now challenge the stereotyped male migration from rural to urban areas. This paper focuses on the perceptions of returned migrants and non-migrants to the emerging independent female migration from the Wa District in the Upper-west region of Ghana to the two largest cities of Ghana, Accra and Kumasi. Using both questionnaire and focus group discussions, 94 return migrants and 86 non-migrants were interviewed in four villages in the Wa district of Ghana. The study shows that lack of job opportunities and more especially, access to farmland at the place of origin compelled the women to migrate to Accra and Kumasi for the kaya yei business. Both return migrants and non-migrants perceived migration as an opportunity through which women acquire basic material items that they need in later life. In particular, the return migrants claimed that their socio-economic status has improved through migration. Although the women benefit in diverse ways through migration this has been at the expense of domestic, conjugal, maternal and kin roles in their place of origin. It is partly for this reason that some community members, especially males, do not support the autonomous migration of women to Accra and Kumasi for the kaya yei business. Nonetheless, given the demonstration effects of return migration and the relatively poor environment of the place of origin, autonomous female migration from the Wa district to Accra or Kumasi for the kaya yei business is likely to continue for the foreseeable future

Related studies

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Tanle, Augustine. "Perceptions of return migrants and non-migrants to female migration: Case of Ghana." Bulletin of the African and African American Studies Program Grand Valley State University (2007).
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