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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - Journal of perinatology
Title Impact of early infant feeding practices on mortality in low birth weight infants from rural Ghana
Author(s)
Volume 28
Issue 6
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2008
Page numbers 438-444
URL http://www.nature.com/jp/journal/v28/n6/abs/jp200819a.html
Abstract
Objective: To assess the impact of early infant feeding practices on low birth weight- (LBW) specific neonatal mortality in rural Ghana.
Study Design: A total of 11?787-breastfed babies were born between July 2003 and June 2004 and survived to day 2. Overall, 3411 (30.3%) infants had weight recorded within 48?h. Two hundred and ninety-six (8.7%) infants were <2.5?kg and 15 died in the neonatal period. Associations were examined using multivariate logistic regression.
Result: Initiation of breastfeeding after day 1 was associated with a threefold increase in mortality risk (adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) 3.23, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) (1.07–9.82)) in infants aged 2 to 28 days. Prelacteal feeding was associated with a threefold significantly increased mortality risk (adjOR 3.12, 95% CI (1.19–8.22)) in infants aged 2 to 28 days but there was no statistically significant increase in risk associated with predominant breastfeeding (adjOR 1.91, 95% CI (0.60–6.09)). There were no modifications of these effects by birth weight. The sample size was insufficient to allow assessment of the impact of partial breastfeeding.
Conclusion: Improving early infant feeding practices is an effective, feasible, low-cost intervention that could reduce early infant mortality in LBW infants in developing countries. These findings are especially relevant for sub-Saharan Africa where many LBW infants are born at home, never taken to a health facility and mortality rates are unacceptably high.

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Edmond, K.M., B.R. Kirkwood, C.A. Tawiah, and S.O. Agyei. "Impact of early infant feeding practices on mortality in low birth weight infants from rural Ghana." Journal of perinatology 28, no. 6 (2008): 438-444.
Copyright DataFirst, University of Cape Town